IP CCTV explained

IP CCTV Systems explained

IP stands for Internet Protocol works by treating each camera as a computer on a network. IP doesn’t mean you need the internet.

IP CCTV offers advanced analytics such as face capture, face recognition, Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR), Fire detection, loitering, object left unattended. You also get the greatest image sharpness (megapixels).

Thanks to networking nature of IP, you can minimise the amount of cabling greatly in comparison to analogue by running each camera to a single switch then from the camera to a NVR. The signal can also be wirelessly transmitted through a Wi-Fi bridge but we highly recommend you hire a professional installer to do this or ask us to preconfigure your system (A fee will be charge).

For an IP system you will need:

  • A Network Video Recorder (NVR)
  • IP cameras
  • Hard drive – Only one needed
  • Ethernet Cables- one per camera
  • Cable clips
  • CCTV monitor screen or your own TV to view it on
  • HDMI cable to connect your screen

What’s the downside of IP CCTV?

First, the cost – IP CCTV systems will cost about 30% more than their “analogue ” versions. if the cost is the first hurdle, then don’t go for IP.

The second disadvantage – If it doesn’t work when you plugged in the cables you need to determine what the fault may be. Most installers struggle with fault-finding IP CCTV systems as they have just been used to plugging 2 wires in and getting a picture. IP needs basic networking skills for fault finding AND the installer must have a thorough knowledge of the product. Most installers don’t even turn up to a job with the basic tool which is a laptop! If you have called an installer to install your IP CCTV system and they don’t have a laptop, think again before letting them loose on your premises. IPADS and iPhones won’t do!

What do we suggest to ensure your install goes smoothly? Buy a simple CAT5 tester which is about £10, Test the cable with this tool and make sure all connections are secure by moving the cables. If you have made the cables up correctly and plugged one end into the NVR and other ends into a camera without stretching the cable and without going over 100meters, then you either have a faulty camera, faulty NVR or camera may not be compatible or there is a firmware mismatch if you didn’t buy the recorder and camera at the same time.

If any parts of the system are wireless, make you configure the units before you go up the ladder.

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